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Jeff Brady is a National Desk Correspondent based in Philadelphia, where he covers the mid-Atlantic region and energy issues. Brady helped establish NPR's environment and energy collaborative which brings together NPR and Member station reporters from across the country to cover the big stories involving the natural world. Brady approaches energy stories from the consumer side of the light switch and the gas pump in an effort to demystify an industry that can seem complicated and opaque. Frequently traveling throughout the country for NPR, Brady has visited a solar power plant in the Nevada desert that lights casinos after the sun goes down. In 2017 his reporting showed a history of racism and sexism that have made it difficult for the oil business to diversify its workforce. In 2011 Brady led NPR's coverage of the Jerry Sandusky child sexual abuse scandal at Penn State—from the night legendary football coach Joe Paterno was fired to the trial where Sandusky was found guilty . In 2005,

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    Nevada's home solar business is in turmoil as the state's Public Utilities Commission starts to phase out incentives for homeowners who install rooftop solar panels. Some of the largest solar companies have stopped seeking new business in the state and laid off hundreds of workers.

    Even for small solar installers, this once-booming business has slowed to a trickle.


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    Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR .

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    Amtrak has started settling lawsuits filed in the wake of a deadly derailment in Philadelphia in May 2015, but the details of those agreements are being kept secret. Eight people were killed and more than 200 others were injured when Amtrak Train 188 derailed after leaving the main Philadelphia station headed for New York. The National Transportation Safety Board concluded the likely cause of the accident was a distracted engineer. Investigators found that engineer Brandon Bostian was paying attention to radio chatter about a nearby train that had been hit by a rock. After passing by that stopped train, according to the NTSB report, Bostian made the mistake of accelerating into a curve instead of slowing down. That caused the train to derail. Dozens of lawsuits were filed after the accident and Amtrak has acknowledged liability, as WHYY's Bobby Allyn reported in February . Among the first lawsuits to be settled was one filed by Jessica Baen of New York. Her attorney, Adam Barrist, told

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    The U.S. has set a new record for how much gasoline the country consumes in a month. Drivers burned more than 405 million gallons of gas a day in June, the latest month counted. The Energy Information Administration says that's the highest amount ever, on records dating back to 1946. Just a few years back, when the economy was suffering, " staycations " became popular. But now people clearly want to be out on the road. The Federal Highway Administration says Americans drove 280 billion miles in June, up 3 percent from June 2015. At Valley Forge National Historical Park outside of Philadelphia the parking lot has cars from all over the place — Tennessee, New York, Montana and Washington state. "Because the gasoline prices have been so low this summer, I've been able to go a lot farther and see a lot more than I initially thought I would be able to," says Roberta Tower of Seattle. She's retired and is three months into a cross-country trip with her small SUV and camp trailer. Gas prices

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    In North Dakota, work has stopped on one section of the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline . Still, over the weekend protesters continued to stream into camps set up near the construction site. One protest camp is about an hour's drive south of Bismarck. A prairie there is covered with tepees, tents and RVs. Flags from tribes around the country line the dirt road into the camp. "We brought a ton of water, sleeping bags, mats to sleep on," says Jessie Weahkee of Albuquerque. She traveled 17 hours from Albuquerque to bring a moving truck full of donations for the hundreds of people who are now living at the camp. The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe opposes the pipeline because the route crosses sacred sites and burial places. They're also concerned that if the pipeline ruptures it could pollute local drinking water. Weahkee says her family faced a similar situation back home. They opposed plans to build a highway through Petroglyph National Monument, but they lost that battle. So she's here

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    Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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    Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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    Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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    Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR .

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    Expressing political beliefs with a yard sign is common. But business owners can hurt their bottom lines by advertising an opinion. Political scientists and marketing experts generally advise against doing that, as we first reported during the 2012 election . Despite the advice, some business owners are willing to risk a financial hit, depending on whether their customers agree with them. The Philadelphia suburbs are swing territory during elections, so you won't find many signs in shop windows there. Owners don't want to risk alienating up to half their customer base. But in Republican-dominated rural Pennsylvania? No problem. "Our country's headed in a bad direction. We need to get it turned around and I think Trump's going do that for us," says 28-year-old Adam Miller. His family owns Miller's Auto Sales and Service in Dillsburg, Pa. The Millers agreed to have a 4-foot-by-8-foot red, white and blue Trump sign outside where thousands of drivers see it on Route 15 every day. Putting

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    Amy Goodman — the host of the left-leaning Democracy Now news program will not face criminal charges for her coverage of an oil pipeline protest in North Dakota last month. At least not for now — prosecutors say they may still bring charges later. On Sept. 3, Goodman and her crew captured images of security teams with dogs trying to keep protesters from entering a pipeline construction site. She wanted to know if security members were "telling the dogs to bite the protesters?" Demonstrators — many from the local Standing Rock Sioux Tribe — crossed a fence when they saw bulldozers plowing over an area they say is a sacred site. It's on private property and authorities say the protesters were trespassing. Goodman followed them to get the story. The prosecutor planned to charge her with criminal trespassing. But last week Special Assistant State's Attorney Ladd Erickson dropped that charge and pursued a riot charge instead. The judge determined there was not enough probable cause to

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    Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: In North Dakota, protesters and police clashed again today over construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. The Standing Rock Sioux tribe says this oil pipeline would cross sacred land and could leak and contaminate natural resources. NPR's Jeff Brady joins us now from Bismarck. Hi, Jeff. JEFF BRADY, BYLINE: Hey. SHAPIRO: Catch us up on the latest. What's happening? BRADY: So this morning, a group of protesters - they started building a wood pedestrian bridge across a creek. They were apparently trying to get back onto the property where the pipeline is being constructed. It's being built near a dam on the Missouri River. And police used a boat to pull that bridge apart. The protesters continued to try to get over. The - some of them were swimming. It's very cold here right now. And some of them were in boats. Police told the protesters that if they continued to come on the land, they were going to be arrested. And that started

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    Police used pepper spray and what they called nonlethal ammunition to remove Dakota Access Pipeline protesters from federal land Wednesday. Demonstrators say they were trying to occupy land just north of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation where construction of the controversial pipeline is scheduled. This was the first significant clash between law enforcement and protesters since demonstrations turned violent last week and more than 100 people were arrested. According to the Morton County, N.D., Sheriff's Department, a group of people began building a wood pedestrian bridge across a creek north of the main protest camp early Wednesday morning. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers owns the land and had asked law enforcement to remove any protesters who try to reach it. Officers in boats pulled the makeshift bridge apart and warned protesters they would be arrested if they continued to trespass. After a several-hour standoff with police, protesters dispersed and returned to their main camp

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    Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit SCOTT SIMON, HOST: Protests against the Dakota Access Oil Pipeline continue along with periodic clashes between police and demonstrators. This week, President Obama said the Army Corps of Engineers may reroute the pipeline. As NPR's Jeff Brady reports, the Corps also met with the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe to try and avoid future confrontations with protesters. JEFF BRADY, BYLINE: At the main protest camp about 40 miles south of Bismarck along the Missouri River, announcements blare from a loudspeaker throughout the day. UNIDENTIFIED ANNOUNCER: Relatives, this red van is the one that has all your sacred items - whatever was left up there. BRADY: Across a dusty road, there's a U-Haul truck. It was filled with protesters' belongings that were removed last week from a site along the planned pipeline route. Now all that stuff is on the ground. And Lolly Bee is sifting through it. LOLLY BEE: Huge piles of sleeping bags and blankets and clothing and

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    Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit KELLY MCEVERS, HOST: For months now, demonstrators have protested against the Dakota Access oil pipeline in North Dakota, and they've drawn inspiration from a big win last year. President Obama blocked construction of another pipeline, the Keystone XL. President-elect Donald Trump promises an energy policy that embraces fossil fuels, and that, as NPR's Jeff Brady reports, has pipeline opponents rethinking their protest strategy. JEFF BRADY, BYLINE: Here's why environmental groups protest new oil pipelines. These are big projects that are designed to transport oil to where it's sold for decades. SUSAN CASEY-LEFKOWITZ: That's a long time to be locking us in to what often is an expansion of dirty fuels. BRADY: Susan Casey-Lefkowitz is with the Natural Resources Defense Council. If an oil company can't get its crude to where there are buyers, then it won't drill for it in the first place. The oil will be kept in the ground. Casey-Lefkowitz says the

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    Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit AUDIE CORNISH, HOST: In North Dakota yesterday, a frosty day, police officers sprayed water on demonstrators who tried to pass a police barricade on a bridge. And this confrontation and the many before it are over construction of the Dakota Access pipeline near a Native American reservation. Crews are still working on the pipeline even as the Obama administration considers whether to reroute the project. The demonstrations have attracted Native American activists from around the world. They're all opposed to the pipeline. But as NPR's Jeff Brady reports, many have personal reasons for being there. JEFF BRADY, BYLINE: The main protest camp near the Missouri River, south of Bismarck, has grown into a small village of sorts. Dirt roads wind through dozens of teepees. Outside a large tent that serves as a makeshift kitchen, Dorothy Sun Bear introduces herself in her native Lakota language. DOROTHY SUN BEAR: (Native American language spoken). BRADY:

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    Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: Donald Trump tweeted this evening that he'll be naming his choice for secretary of state tomorrow morning. Several news outlets are reporting that the president-elect will nominate ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson. NPR has not confirmed that. Over the weekend, Donald Trump praised Tillerson but would not confirm the choice. Tillerson is a giant in the business world with ties to Russia. NPR's Jeff Brady has more on the oil and gas executive. JEFF BRADY, BYLINE: Rex Tillerson is a Texas man. He was born in the state and has lived much of his life there. He brags about being an Eagle Scout in this Boy Scouts of America video. (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING) REX TILLERSON: I have a lot of terrific memories associated with scouting. Probably most of the high points of my growing up years are associated with my scouting activities. BRADY: Tillerson is a University of Texas at Austin graduate where he studied civil engineering before

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    Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit AUDIE CORNISH, HOST: President-elect Donald Trump's choice for secretary of state is ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson. Tillerson has spent four decades at the company, and he's announced he'll retire at the end of the year. If confirmed, Tillerson would be the first secretary of state to have never worked in government before. But as NPR's Jeff Brady reports, he does have some diplomatic experience. JEFF BRADY, BYLINE: Imagine the life of an oil company CEO. If you're thinking it's all private jets and cigars, well, maybe that's part of it, but global politics also is an important element. JOHN HOFMEISTER: I had a secret clearance with the CIA, with the FBI, et cetera. BRADY: John Hofmeister was president of Shell Oil for three years about a decade back. He says regular contact with those agencies and the State Department is an important part of an oil company executive's job. HOFMEISTER: I was informing them, they were informing me of the security

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    Many transgender people in the U.S. are rushing to change their designated gender on government documents before President-elect Donald Trump takes office. They worry the next administration may take that ability away. There's no indication so far that this is a priority for Trump. Mara Keisling with the National Center for Transgender Equality says Trump's positions on trans issues are not clear. But she's concerned about people he's nominated for key positions in his administration. "Virtually every — if not every — appointment he has announced so far has been an extremely anti-LGBT person," says Keisling. She says trans advocacy groups around the country have been fielding calls from concerned people ever since the election. And they are not alone. "The calls to our office have increased a lot," says Benjamin Jerner, managing partner of the Philadelphia law firm Jerner

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    Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: President Obama made a last-minute move today to protect some of his environmental legacy. He ordered a permanent ban on oil drilling in large parts of the Arctic and Atlantic Oceans. The Obama administration says this decision cannot be reversed by future presidents. NPR's Jeff Brady joins us now. And Jeff, what exactly is President Obama telling his administration to do here? JEFF BRADY, BYLINE: This this order that the president has signed - it puts two very large areas off limits to drilling for oil and gas. One of those areas is in the Atlantic Ocean. It's nearly 6,000 square miles. It stretches from New England, offshore of Massachusetts all the way down to the Chesapeake Bay off the coast of Virginia. And the second area is up in the Arctic off the northern coast of Alaska. It's the entire Chukchi Sea and much of the Beaufort Sea except for this little strip along the northern coast of Alaska where there's already a lot

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