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Jeff Brady is a National Desk Correspondent based in Philadelphia, where he covers the mid-Atlantic region and energy issues. Brady helped establish NPR's environment and energy collaborative which brings together NPR and Member station reporters from across the country to cover the big stories involving the natural world. Brady approaches energy stories from the consumer side of the light switch and the gas pump in an effort to demystify an industry that can seem complicated and opaque. Frequently traveling throughout the country for NPR, Brady has visited a solar power plant in the Nevada desert that lights casinos after the sun goes down. In 2017 his reporting showed a history of racism and sexism that have made it difficult for the oil business to diversify its workforce. In 2011 Brady led NPR's coverage of the Jerry Sandusky child sexual abuse scandal at Penn State—from the night legendary football coach Joe Paterno was fired to the trial where Sandusky was found guilty . In 2005,

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    The U.S. could become a net exporter of energy in coming years, according to the federal government's Annual Energy Outlook 2017 . This continues a trend the Energy Information Administration has highlighted before in its annual report. The EIA projects the country will continue to import oil through 2050, though at much lower levels than in the past. The main thing that will make the U.S. a net exporter of energy is natural gas. Domestic natural gas production has risen by nearly 30 percent over the past decade, primarily because controversial technologies such as hydraulic fracturing have opened up new fields to drilling. Now companies are proposing and building natural gas export facilities around the country with the production boom expected to continue. The EIA is quick to warn that there is a lot of uncertainty in projections like this. That's why each year the agency considers a variety of factors and then develops multiple scenarios. It looks at things like production, demand,

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    This story is part of Kitchen Table Conversations , a series from NPR's National Desk that examines how Americans from all walks of life are moving forward from the presidential election. Pennsylvania surprised a lot of people in November when voters abandoned a long history of electing Democrats for president and chose Republican Donald Trump. Jamie Ruppert, a 33-year-old mother in Luzerne County , is among those who switched parties and voted for Trump. It's an exciting time in Ruppert's life: She has two toddlers and a baby due this summer. Her husband recently started a promising new job in the fossil fuel business — one that pays well enough that she can stay home with the kids. Ruppert and husband Jesse bought a modest house a bit over a year ago. It sits on two acres in a rural neighborhood outside Wilkes-Barre, Pa. Life is pretty good; still Ruppert thinks the country needs a change. "I was always raised in a Democratic house," says Ruppert, "both of my parents voted Democrat

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    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MyMosJdIfdo When former Texas Gov. Rick Perry faces the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources for his confirmation hearing on Thursday, his first test could be whether he remembers the name of the agency he's been picked to head. The Department of Energy (DOE) is one of three agencies Perry proposed eliminating when he was running for president in 2011. During a debate, he successfully listed the Department of Commerce and the Department of Education. But he couldn't bring to mind the name of the third agency — the Energy Department. "That one moment in time doesn't negate the fact that he was a successful governor who led a dynamic state," says Perry's former Chief of Staff Deirdre Delisi. Perry was the longest-serving governor of Texas — 14 years over three terms. Since energy is such a big part of the Texas economy, supporters say Perry is an obvious choice for the Cabinet position. But the department is about more than energy. It also keeps

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    Even Rick Perry changes his mind. At his confirmation hearing as President-elect Donald Trump's pick for Secretary of Energy, the former Texas governor said he no longer wants to do away with the department he once said should be eliminated. Or, at least, that was something he tried to say. In 2011, during one of his presidential campaign debates, Perry could only remember the names of two of the three agencies he wanted get rid of. The third agency is the very one he was chosen by Trump to head. Perry said at the hearing that he regrets ever suggesting that idea. "My past statements made over five years ago about abolishing the Department of Energy do not reflect my current thinking," Perry said. That was not the only message that differed from his past views. At various times, Perry has questioned the role of human activity in climate change. At one campaign event, he accused scientists of manipulating data to continue gaining funding on research. Today, Perry said he believed both

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    Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: As we mentioned, President Trump took action today to speed up permits for building the Keystone XL and the Dakota Access Pipelines. The oil industry and its supporters are cheering the move. Opponents, including environmentalists, Native Americans, and landowners, have vowed to fight even harder to block pipeline construction. NPR's Jeff Brady reports. JEFF BRADY, BYLINE: President Trump's directive today on the pipelines was not a surprise. He made a campaign pledge to do this. But another element of today's announcement is less clear. Trump directed the secretary of commerce to develop a plan that ensures new pipelines - that is the pipes themselves - are made in the U.S. (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING) PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: We will build our own pipeline. We will build our own pipes. That's what it has to do with - like we used to in the old days. BRADY: It's not exactly clear how this made-in-America directive will

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    The day after his inauguration, President Trump placed a call to the acting head of the National Park Service, Michael Reynolds. "I can confirm that the call took place. I can't comment on the content of the conversation," National Park Service spokesman Tom Crosson said in an email to NPR. Trump reportedly was upset over the agency's retweeting of side-by-side photos that unfavorably compared the crowd sizes at his and former President Obama's inaugurations. The retweet was later removed. "It was a, 'What's going on?' type of thing," White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders told The New York Times on Thursday night. "Why is the National Park Service tweeting out comparison photos? That was the bigger issue there." The Washington Post, which first reported the phone call , said Trump ordered Reynolds to provide photos of Inauguration Day crowds on the National Mall on Jan. 20, with the intent of proving the media "had lied in reporting that attendance was no better than average."

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    It's not often you get a chance to come face-to-face with that person who made a nasty comment about you on Facebook. But one interviewee from our Kitchen Table Series got a chance to do that. Jamie Ruppert of White Haven, Pa. was featured in a story that aired in January. She's a swing voter and like much of Luzerne County, where she lives, Ruppert switched from voting Democratic in the past to casting her ballot for Trump in 2016. When the story was posted on NPR's Facebook page it received more than 6000 comments. The underlying theme from Rupper's critics was that she had been duped into voting from Trump. We reached out to 10 people on Facebook who posted nasty comments directed at Ruppert. Only two responded. One of them happens to live in the next county over from Ruppert. Amy Whitenight, of Bloomsburg, Pa., posted this comment: "Yeah, I was a little angry at the time," says Whitenight. She says that was right before Trump's inauguration. If she commented now, Whitenight says,

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    Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: Months of protests over the Dakota Access pipeline in North Dakota have come to an end. Construction on the pipeline is going forward after President Trump intervened in January. Now, it's almost finished. Oil could start flowing in the coming weeks. But the Dakota Access pipeline battle at the Standing Rock Reservation has energized others. NPR's Jeff Brady is here to tell us more about pipeline protests around the country. Hi, Jeff. JEFF BRADY, BYLINE: Hi, Ari. SHAPIRO: Have pipelines in general become more controversial lately? BRADY: They have. And it's because of a strategy that's really led by environmental groups. And their goal is to keep fossil fuels in the ground. Now, in the past, those groups, they encourage people to use less oil, drive smaller cars, walk more, that sort of thing. But that didn't work out very well. So they came up with this new strategy. And I think the Keystone XL pipeline - you probably remember

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    Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit DAVID GREENE, HOST: President Donald Trump will be at the Environmental Protection Agency today where he is expected to begin this long process of rolling back climate change policies put in place during the Obama administration. First among them, the Clean Power Plan which would limit carbon emissions from coal fire power plants. NPR's Jeff Brady is with us to talk about this. Jeff, good morning. JEFF BRADY, BYLINE: Good morning. GREENE: So what exactly is the president doing today? BRADY: A senior White House officials says the Clean Power Plan will get a thorough review, and the goal there is to make sure policies fit with the administration's priorities. Those are focusing on energy independence, growing the economy and creating more jobs. And that's how the administration defines it. Environmental groups call this a gutting of the Clean Power Plan. And a few other items we can expect today - the White House wants to end a moratorium on new

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    When President Trump signed an order to roll back climate policies, he promised more jobs for coal miners. "My administration is putting an end to the war on coal. Gonna have clean coal, really clean coal," Trump said in making the announcement at the Environmental Protection Agency headquarters Tuesday. There is a big effort to do reduce coal's effect on climate change by capturing the carbon emissions from coal plants before they escape into the atmosphere. In 2014, coal generated only about 39 percent of the electricity in the U.S., but was responsible for about 77 percent of the carbon dioxide emissions from power plants, according to the EPA . Mississippi Power's Kemper County Energy Facility is the most ambitious carbon capture project in the U.S. right now. It's a new coal power plant, built from the ground up. But there have been a few problems during construction. Originally the plant was estimated to cost $2.4 billion. Now the price tag is nearly three times that at about $7

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    This story is part of Kitchen Table Conversations , a series from NPR's National Desk that examines how Americans from all walks of life are moving forward from the presidential election. This is the third post-election visit with Jamie Ruppert, 33, of White Haven, Pa. Jamie Ruppert, 33, switched parties and voted for Donald Trump in November, and for months has been his enthusiastic supporter. Nearly 100 days into his presidency, the mother of two — her third baby is due in July — still thinks he was best for the country, but worry has been creeping in. She voted for Trump because he promised to crack down on illegal immigration and create more manufacturing jobs. Those are domestic issues, but foreign news has dominated the headlines lately. "I just hope we're not biting off more than we can chew here and that we're ready for whatever repercussions might happen," says Ruppert. Even though she is busy preparing for the baby and caring for her family, Ruppert tries to watch the evening

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    Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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    Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR .

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    Expressing political beliefs with a yard sign is common. But business owners can hurt their bottom lines by advertising an opinion. Political scientists and marketing experts generally advise against doing that, as we first reported during the 2012 election . Despite the advice, some business owners are willing to risk a financial hit, depending on whether their customers agree with them. The Philadelphia suburbs are swing territory during elections, so you won't find many signs in shop windows there. Owners don't want to risk alienating up to half their customer base. But in Republican-dominated rural Pennsylvania? No problem. "Our country's headed in a bad direction. We need to get it turned around and I think Trump's going do that for us," says 28-year-old Adam Miller. His family owns Miller's Auto Sales and Service in Dillsburg, Pa. The Millers agreed to have a 4-foot-by-8-foot red, white and blue Trump sign outside where thousands of drivers see it on Route 15 every day. Putting

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    Amy Goodman — the host of the left-leaning Democracy Now news program will not face criminal charges for her coverage of an oil pipeline protest in North Dakota last month. At least not for now — prosecutors say they may still bring charges later. On Sept. 3, Goodman and her crew captured images of security teams with dogs trying to keep protesters from entering a pipeline construction site. She wanted to know if security members were "telling the dogs to bite the protesters?" Demonstrators — many from the local Standing Rock Sioux Tribe — crossed a fence when they saw bulldozers plowing over an area they say is a sacred site. It's on private property and authorities say the protesters were trespassing. Goodman followed them to get the story. The prosecutor planned to charge her with criminal trespassing. But last week Special Assistant State's Attorney Ladd Erickson dropped that charge and pursued a riot charge instead. The judge determined there was not enough probable cause to

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    Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: Months of protests over the Dakota Access pipeline in North Dakota have come to an end. Construction on the pipeline is going forward after President Trump intervened in January. Now, it's almost finished. Oil could start flowing in the coming weeks. But the Dakota Access pipeline battle at the Standing Rock Reservation has energized others. NPR's Jeff Brady is here to tell us more about pipeline protests around the country. Hi, Jeff. JEFF BRADY, BYLINE: Hi, Ari. SHAPIRO: Have pipelines in general become more controversial lately? BRADY: They have. And it's because of a strategy that's really led by environmental groups. And their goal is to keep fossil fuels in the ground. Now, in the past, those groups, they encourage people to use less oil, drive smaller cars, walk more, that sort of thing. But that didn't work out very well. So they came up with this new strategy. And I think the Keystone XL pipeline - you probably remember

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    Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit DAVID GREENE, HOST: President Donald Trump will be at the Environmental Protection Agency today where he is expected to begin this long process of rolling back climate change policies put in place during the Obama administration. First among them, the Clean Power Plan which would limit carbon emissions from coal fire power plants. NPR's Jeff Brady is with us to talk about this. Jeff, good morning. JEFF BRADY, BYLINE: Good morning. GREENE: So what exactly is the president doing today? BRADY: A senior White House officials says the Clean Power Plan will get a thorough review, and the goal there is to make sure policies fit with the administration's priorities. Those are focusing on energy independence, growing the economy and creating more jobs. And that's how the administration defines it. Environmental groups call this a gutting of the Clean Power Plan. And a few other items we can expect today - the White House wants to end a moratorium on new

    0 0

    When President Trump signed an order to roll back climate policies, he promised more jobs for coal miners. "My administration is putting an end to the war on coal. Gonna have clean coal, really clean coal," Trump said in making the announcement at the Environmental Protection Agency headquarters Tuesday. There is a big effort to do reduce coal's effect on climate change by capturing the carbon emissions from coal plants before they escape into the atmosphere. In 2014, coal generated only about 39 percent of the electricity in the U.S., but was responsible for about 77 percent of the carbon dioxide emissions from power plants, according to the EPA . Mississippi Power's Kemper County Energy Facility is the most ambitious carbon capture project in the U.S. right now. It's a new coal power plant, built from the ground up. But there have been a few problems during construction. Originally the plant was estimated to cost $2.4 billion. Now the price tag is nearly three times that at about $7

    0 0

    This story is part of Kitchen Table Conversations , a series from NPR's National Desk that examines how Americans from all walks of life are moving forward from the presidential election. This is the third post-election visit with Jamie Ruppert, 33, of White Haven, Pa. Jamie Ruppert, 33, switched parties and voted for Donald Trump in November, and for months has been his enthusiastic supporter. Nearly 100 days into his presidency, the mother of two — her third baby is due in July — still thinks he was best for the country, but worry has been creeping in. She voted for Trump because he promised to crack down on illegal immigration and create more manufacturing jobs. Those are domestic issues, but foreign news has dominated the headlines lately. "I just hope we're not biting off more than we can chew here and that we're ready for whatever repercussions might happen," says Ruppert. Even though she is busy preparing for the baby and caring for her family, Ruppert tries to watch the evening

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    Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: President Trump may decide soon if he wants to withdraw the United States from an agreement on climate change. The Paris accord, as it's called, commits many nations to do what they can to reduce carbon emissions. Interest groups and businesses are intensely lobbying as the Trump administration considers what to do. NPR's Jeff Brady is here to talk about what's at stake. Hi, Jeff. JEFF BRADY, BYLINE: Good morning. INSKEEP: Has the president specifically promised what to do? BRADY: Well, you know, during the campaign, he vowed to cancel U.S. involvement in the Paris climate agreement. There was a big policy speech in North Dakota where he said that he was going to pull the United States out of that agreement. He seems to have toned down the language a bit since then. In Harrisburg, Pa., last month for that 100 day speech, he mentioned a decision was coming soon, but he didn't say exactly what that decision is going to be. What

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