Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Showcase


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

Jeff Brady is a National Desk Correspondent based in Philadelphia, where he covers the mid-Atlantic region and energy issues. Brady helped establish NPR's environment and energy collaborative which brings together NPR and Member station reporters from across the country to cover the big stories involving the natural world. Brady approaches energy stories from the consumer side of the light switch and the gas pump in an effort to demystify an industry that can seem complicated and opaque. Frequently traveling throughout the country for NPR, Brady has visited a solar power plant in the Nevada desert that lights casinos after the sun goes down. In 2017 his reporting showed a history of racism and sexism that have made it difficult for the oil business to diversify its workforce. In 2011 Brady led NPR's coverage of the Jerry Sandusky child sexual abuse scandal at Penn State—from the night legendary football coach Joe Paterno was fired to the trial where Sandusky was found guilty . In 2005,

older | 1 | 2 | 3 | (Page 4) | 5 | 6 | newer

    0 0

    Updated at 3:45 p.m. ET Penn State University's Board of Trustees approved a series of new initiatives Friday that are designed to change how the school's fraternities and sororities are regulated. The change comes after the death of 19-year-old sophomore Timothy Piazza brought new attention to the problem of hazing. The most significant move is that Penn State will take over the monitoring and disciplinary processes currently run by student organizations. In announcing the changes, Penn State President Eric Barron said the university will encourage other schools to crack down on hazing, too. "We intend to take a national leadership role in this, and as a matter of fact, I will introduce to the Big Ten this weekend that we organize a national conference on Greek life," said Barron. Barron also said Penn State will urge state lawmakers to strengthen penalties for hazing. Piazza's parents, Evelyn and James, have not seen the video that captured the events before their son's death but

    0 0

    Some of Nevada's largest solar installation companies plan to resume doing business in the state. For the past year-and-a-half Tesla (formerly SolarCity) and Sunrun stopped seeking new customers in this sunny part of the country because the state's Public Utilities Commission chose to phase out incentives for homeowners who install rooftop solar panels. Now, Republican Gov. Brian Sandoval plans to sign into law a bill that brings back "net metering." Net metering has been a key reason for the rapid growth of the residential solar power business across the U.S. It allows homeowners with solar panels to sell excess electricity to their utility at retail instead of wholesale rates. This appeals to many homeowners because they can do something good for the environment and save money on their energy bill. Utilities are not fans of net metering. That's because every kilowatt generated on a home roof is one less that the local utility sells. And some of that money utilities collect is used to

    0 0

    The type of siding or "cladding" used on the Grenfell Tower in London — and suspected of feeding the massive fire that killed dozens of residents — is not allowed on the exterior of tall buildings across most of the U.S. But a few states and the District of Columbia have relaxed building codes in recent years and have started to permit the use of some cladding containing components that don't pass a fire test. The cladding installed on Grenfell Tower as part of a 2016 refurbishing project has become a focus for investigators. NPR's Frank Langfitt has confirmed that the cladding had a combustible polyethylene core rather than a more fire-resistant mineral core. At least 79 people died last week when the fire spread quickly through the 24-story public housing tower. Investigators say a refrigerator started the fire , which then spread to the cladding outside. Prime Minister Theresa May told Parliament that similar cladding on other buildings has been found to be combustible. Reuters

    0 0

    NPR reporters are returning to their hometowns this summer to find out how they've changed – from job prospects to schools and how people see their community and the country. Once home to thriving timber and fishing industries, Gold Beach, Oregon now subsists on tourists and retirees looking for a quiet beach, a nice river trip and, in a few cases, marijuana. I left Gold Beach after graduating from high school in 1985. Back then, it was a blue-collar town dominated by the timber industry. Returning 32 years later there are fewer log trucks on the roads, the big mill outside town is gone and the economy has fundamentally changed. Before I get into details, let's address the question everyone has about Gold Beach. I'm sorry to say there is no "gold" on the "beach". There was some near the mouth of the Rogue River but it was mined in the late 1800s, according to the Oregon Historical Society. A century later, a different extractive industry was at the center of the local economy. Most of

    0 0

    The U.S. power grid could become less reliable if too much electricity comes from renewable energy and natural gas, according to a study from the Department of Energy. But not everyone is buying it. Environmentalists suspect the Trump administration is just trying to prop up an ailing coal industry. Energy Secretary Rick Perry called for the study in the spring. The report doesn't say there is a grid reliability problem now — only that one could develop if more coal and nuclear power plants shut down. Those plants are having trouble competing with cheaper natural gas and renewable energy at a time when the country is using less electricity. The Energy Department study points out that coal and nuclear generate power whenever it's needed, while solar and wind can be less predictable. This echoes an argument that traditional utilities and power generators have made for years. "The most reliable and resilient grid is the type that will balance traditional base load sources of power with

    0 0

    Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: While Corpus Christi and the surrounding area got the brunt of the storm, strong winds and heavy rains also inundated Houston, damaging many homes. NPR's Jeff Brady spent some time with residents who had fled their homes and then went back to see what the storm had left. JEFF BRADY, BYLINE: In a large neighborhood called Sienna Plantation southwest of Houston, there were a lot of downed trees and limbs. (SOUNDBITE OF CHAINSAW REVVING) BRADY: Some houses had parts of the roof torn off. Linda Varnado says a strong storm, possibly a tornado, moved through the neighborhood. LINDA VARNADO: It's true when they tell you that it sounds like a freight train coming through because that's what it is. It sounds like a freight train. And it's a sound that you don't want to hear. And I don't ever want to hear it again. (SOUNDBITE OF SWEEPING) BRADY: As she swept water off the sidewalk, Varnado said the wind tore shingles off her roof and

    0 0

    Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit RACHEL MARTIN, HOST: President Trump has now declared a state of emergency in Louisiana, as tropical storm Harvey moves east from Texas. That will allow the Federal Emergency Management Agency, or FEMA, to coordinate response to any damage that the storm might cause in that state. FEMA is already working around the clock in Texas, where the tropical storm is now stalled over Houston and surrounding communities. That area has been hit by unprecendented flooding. And FEMA says more than 30,000 people are expected to be housed in shelters. My co-host David Greene is on the ground reporting from Texas this morning. DAVID GREENE, HOST: Hey, there, Rachel. Yeah, we came in here last night. We had to drive in from Dallas because of the airport situation in Houston. It was just - it was a surreal drive. I mean, it was - there was not rain in the beginning. There was this beautiful rainbow. And then you started to get within two hours or so of Houston, the

    0 0

    Installing solar panels on your home could become more expensive, depending on how President Trump responds to a decision Friday by the U.S. International Trade Commission. The ITC found that low-cost, imported solar panels from China and other countries have hurt two domestic manufacturers. They are Georgia-based Suniva and Oregon-based SolarWorld. Trump has focused his energy policy on fossil fuels, like coal, more than renewable energy and he campaigned on boosting domestic manufacturing. Much of the solar industry worries the president will choose to levy steep tariffs on imported solar panels to favor domestic manufacturers. Suniva and SolarWorld praised the ITC decision saying it could help revive the solar panel manufacturing business in the U.S. As Will Stone of member station KJZZ reported in August, the companies argued that they can't compete with foreign manufacturers. In a statement after the ITC decision SolarWorld Americas President and CEO Juergen Stein said, "We

    0 0

    The Trump administration announced Thursday that it has temporarily waived a U.S. shipping restriction for Puerto Rico known as the Jones Act. Under the law, only U.S.-flagged ships are allowed to move goods between any U.S. ports. Now foreign-flagged vessels also will be able to move shipments from the U.S. mainland to Puerto Rico and between ports there. The move is intended to boost the delivery of much-needed relief supplies after Hurricane Maria battered the U.S. territory last week. The Puerto Rico Federal Affairs Administration thanked President Trump in a tweet: That was in response to an announcement from White House press secretary Sarah Sanders: NPR's Planet Money examined the Jones Act and says the 90-year-old law applies only to shipping, not other forms of transportation: "If you want to send a bunch of oranges by truck from Florida to Baltimore, no one cares who made the truck. Or if you want to fly computer chips across the country, it's fine if the plane is made in

    0 0

    The chairman of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe in North Dakota has been voted out of office, just about one year after the Dakota Access Pipeline protests . Unofficial results show Dave Archambault received about 37 percent of the 1,710 votes cast. His challenger, current tribal councilman Mike Faith, received 63 percent. Archambault conceded defeat in a statement on Facebook: Under Archambault's leadership the tribe opposed the 1,000-mile, $3.8 billion pipeline. It transports up to 520,000 barrels of crude a day from North Dakota to Illinois. A section of the pipeline is located just north of the tribe's reservation, and opponents argued construction would compromise sacred lands. They also worried that part of the pipeline under the Missouri River could leak and pollute local drinking water. The tribe's opposition inspired protest camps that attracted demonstrators from around the world. There were clashes with police and hundreds of people were arrested. While the pipeline protests

    0 0

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lRnVJ7Mgt0I The U.S. oil industry is trying to find a new generation of workers in a country that is becoming more diverse. But a history of sexism and racism is making that difficult. The oil industry has struggled to solve its diversity problem despite having some big advantages. It's a wealthy industry accustomed to taking on complicated challenges (think deep-water offshore drilling and fracking). And oil and gas companies already have decades of experience operating all over the world in various environments. Still, the diversity problem persists. "The racism in this job, it's unreal" In the mid-1980s the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission tried to address one large case of racism and sexism involving a union — Pipeliners Local 798 based in Tulsa, Okla. The union is a big player in the pipeline construction business. It dispatches welders and their helpers to large projects across much of the U.S. Attorney Bob Harwin, who argued the

    0 0

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XbAtZyy4zRI Think "renewable energy" and the wind and sun come to mind, but someday it may be possible to add ocean energy to that list. The fledgling wave energy industry is getting a boost from the federal government. The Department of Energy is spending up to $40 million to build a wave energy test facility off the Oregon coast. Wave energy has a long way to go before it's ready to power the lights in your house. At this point, engineers aren't even quite sure how best to capture the power of the water. "We don't know what the right kind of wave energy converter is," says Belinda Batten, executive associate dean of the College of Engineering at Oregon State University. Batten says part of the challenge is that the ocean moves in different directions depending on the location. "It goes up and down when you're out in the water," she says. "As you're getting close to the coast, it's going back and forth in surge. Within the ocean, the particles go around

    0 0

    Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: A Pennsylvania grand jury has issued a scathing report on the state of fraternity life at Penn State University. It says school officials were remarkably undisturbed by complaints about excessive and dangerous alcohol abuse. It says the school was more interested in marketing itself as a fun place to be. A 19-year-old sophomore died back in February during an alcohol-fueled hazing ritual at one fraternity. NPR's Jeff Brady joins us now from State College Pennsylvania. And, Jeff, that's the top line of the report. What else did it say? JEFF BRADY, BYLINE: Well, it said a lot. It said - the report is 144 pages long. And members of the grand jury, they lay out that case that suggests Penn State knew it had a problem with excessive drinking and hazing but failed to address it. And there's a lot of focus on one program where monitors and checkers go around to frat parties looking for violations of laws or university rules. But that

    0 0

    Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: The Trump administration repealed President Obama's signature climate plan this fall. The fossil fuel industry cheered that move. It had spent years fighting limits on power plant emissions. Now some fossil fuel companies are worried because so far it's not clear exactly how or even whether the administration will replace the Clean Power Plan. NPR's Jeff Brady reports. JEFF BRADY, BYLINE: The most vocal critics of the Obama administration's Clean Power Plan are in the coal industry, chief among them Bob Murray, head of coal company Murray Energy. He testified at a public hearing in West Virginia last month. (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING) BOB MURRAY: The Clean Power Plan would devastate coal-fired electricity generation in America as well as the United States' coal industry. BRADY: Coal companies are struggling mainly because of competition from cheaper natural gas, but the Clean Power Plan gets much of the blame even though

    0 0

    Updated at 7:43 p.m. ET Part of the Republican tax overhaul that President Trump signed into law last week has homeowners around the country doing something unusual: rushing to pay their 2018 property taxes well before the due date. That's because the new law includes a $10,000 cap on the amount of state and local taxes people can deduct on their federal returns. Before, if someone paid $24,000 in property taxes — as some people in higher tax states like New York and California do — and then paid $20,000 in state and local income taxes they were allowed to deduct $44,000 on their federal tax return. Now that number is capped at $10,000. The change could cost some people thousands of dollars. In response to questions from taxpayers and preparers, the Internal Revenue Service issued new guidance Wednesday. The IRS says taxes can be prepaid and deducted from federal returns if local authorities levy the taxes in 2017 and they are paid by Dec. 31. "I'm sending my checks in today," said

    0 0

    Installing solar panels on your home could become more expensive, depending on how President Trump responds to a decision Friday by the U.S. International Trade Commission. The ITC found that low-cost, imported solar panels from China and other countries have hurt two domestic manufacturers. They are Georgia-based Suniva and Oregon-based SolarWorld. Trump has focused his energy policy on fossil fuels, like coal, more than renewable energy and he campaigned on boosting domestic manufacturing. Much of the solar industry worries the president will choose to levy steep tariffs on imported solar panels to favor domestic manufacturers. Suniva and SolarWorld praised the ITC decision saying it could help revive the solar panel manufacturing business in the U.S. As Will Stone of member station KJZZ reported in August, the companies argued that they can't compete with foreign manufacturers. In a statement after the ITC decision SolarWorld Americas President and CEO Juergen Stein said, "We

    0 0

    The Trump administration announced Thursday that it has temporarily waived a U.S. shipping restriction for Puerto Rico known as the Jones Act. Under the law, only U.S.-flagged ships are allowed to move goods between any U.S. ports. Now foreign-flagged vessels also will be able to move shipments from the U.S. mainland to Puerto Rico and between ports there. The move is intended to boost the delivery of much-needed relief supplies after Hurricane Maria battered the U.S. territory last week. The Puerto Rico Federal Affairs Administration thanked President Trump in a tweet: That was in response to an announcement from White House press secretary Sarah Sanders: NPR's Planet Money examined the Jones Act and says the 90-year-old law applies only to shipping, not other forms of transportation: "If you want to send a bunch of oranges by truck from Florida to Baltimore, no one cares who made the truck. Or if you want to fly computer chips across the country, it's fine if the plane is made in

    0 0

    The chairman of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe in North Dakota has been voted out of office, just about one year after the Dakota Access Pipeline protests . Unofficial results show Dave Archambault received about 37 percent of the 1,710 votes cast. His challenger, current tribal councilman Mike Faith, received 63 percent. Archambault conceded defeat in a statement on Facebook: Under Archambault's leadership the tribe opposed the 1,000-mile, $3.8 billion pipeline. It transports up to 520,000 barrels of crude a day from North Dakota to Illinois. A section of the pipeline is located just north of the tribe's reservation, and opponents argued construction would compromise sacred lands. They also worried that part of the pipeline under the Missouri River could leak and pollute local drinking water. The tribe's opposition inspired protest camps that attracted demonstrators from around the world. There were clashes with police and hundreds of people were arrested. While the pipeline protests

    0 0

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lRnVJ7Mgt0I The U.S. oil industry is trying to find a new generation of workers in a country that is becoming more diverse. But a history of sexism and racism is making that difficult. The oil industry has struggled to solve its diversity problem despite having some big advantages. It's a wealthy industry accustomed to taking on complicated challenges (think deep-water offshore drilling and fracking). And oil and gas companies already have decades of experience operating all over the world in various environments. Still, the diversity problem persists. "The racism in this job, it's unreal" In the mid-1980s the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission tried to address one large case of racism and sexism involving a union — Pipeliners Local 798 based in Tulsa, Okla. The union is a big player in the pipeline construction business. It dispatches welders and their helpers to large projects across much of the U.S. Attorney Bob Harwin, who argued the

    0 0

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XbAtZyy4zRI Think "renewable energy" and the wind and sun come to mind, but someday it may be possible to add ocean energy to that list. The fledgling wave energy industry is getting a boost from the federal government. The Department of Energy is spending up to $40 million to build a wave energy test facility off the Oregon coast. Wave energy has a long way to go before it's ready to power the lights in your house. At this point, engineers aren't even quite sure how best to capture the power of the water. "We don't know what the right kind of wave energy converter is," says Belinda Batten, executive associate dean of the College of Engineering at Oregon State University. Batten says part of the challenge is that the ocean moves in different directions depending on the location. "It goes up and down when you're out in the water," she says. "As you're getting close to the coast, it's going back and forth in surge. Within the ocean, the particles go around

older | 1 | 2 | 3 | (Page 4) | 5 | 6 | newer