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Jeff Brady is a National Desk Correspondent based in Philadelphia, where he covers the mid-Atlantic region and energy issues. Brady helped establish NPR's environment and energy collaborative which brings together NPR and Member station reporters from across the country to cover the big stories involving the natural world. Brady approaches energy stories from the consumer side of the light switch and the gas pump in an effort to demystify an industry that can seem complicated and opaque. Frequently traveling throughout the country for NPR, Brady has visited a solar power plant in the Nevada desert that lights casinos after the sun goes down. In 2017 his reporting showed a history of racism and sexism that have made it difficult for the oil business to diversify its workforce. In 2011 Brady led NPR's coverage of the Jerry Sandusky child sexual abuse scandal at Penn State—from the night legendary football coach Joe Paterno was fired to the trial where Sandusky was found guilty . In 2005,

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    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yh2DwRkLIQE Mention the Philadelphia Eagles and last year's Super Bowl win comes to mind. But so does that time fans booed and pelted Santa Claus with snow balls. It happened 50 years ago on Saturday. The game on Dec. 15, 1968 between the Eagles and the Minnesota Vikings wasn't memorable, but what happened at halftime was. The basic story has been repeated over the decades, but this is what it boils down to. The Eagles were having a bad season. This game wasn't going well, either, so the fans held on to their anger for the halftime show. "Poor, little, old Santa Claus got bombarded while my dad and I sat in the stands with our hands over our heads," remembers Gail Wehmeyer, an Eagles fan and season ticket holder since 1961. Wehmeyer says fans behind her didn't have great aim. So she got pelted, too. The man in the suit was 20-year-old Frank Olivo. He's since died, but he spoke about that day with ESPN seven years ago. "I remember watching a fellow make a

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    In another proposed reversal of an Obama-era standard, the Environmental Protection Agency Friday said limiting mercury and other toxic emissions from coal- and oil-fired power plants is not cost-effective and should not be considered "appropriate and necessary." The EPA says it is keeping the 2012 restrictions in place for now, in large part because utilities have already spent billions to comply with them. But environmental groups worry the move is a step toward repealing the limits and could make it harder to impose other regulations in the future. In a statement, the EPA said it is "providing regulatory certainty by transparently and accurately taking account of both costs and benefits." The National Mining Association welcomed the move, calling the mercury limits "punitive" and "massively unbalanced." When coal is burned it releases mercury into the air, where it can cause health risks to people including neurological disorders, heart and lung problems and compromised immune

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    Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: The Trump administration repealed President Obama's signature climate plan this fall. The fossil fuel industry cheered that move. It had spent years fighting limits on power plant emissions. Now some fossil fuel companies are worried because so far it's not clear exactly how or even whether the administration will replace the Clean Power Plan. NPR's Jeff Brady reports. JEFF BRADY, BYLINE: The most vocal critics of the Obama administration's Clean Power Plan are in the coal industry, chief among them Bob Murray, head of coal company Murray Energy. He testified at a public hearing in West Virginia last month. (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING) BOB MURRAY: The Clean Power Plan would devastate coal-fired electricity generation in America as well as the United States' coal industry. BRADY: Coal companies are struggling mainly because of competition from cheaper natural gas, but the Clean Power Plan gets much of the blame even though

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    In another proposed reversal of an Obama-era standard, the Environmental Protection Agency Friday said limiting mercury and other toxic emissions from coal- and oil-fired power plants is not cost-effective and should not be considered "appropriate and necessary." The EPA says it is keeping the 2012 restrictions in place for now, in large part because utilities have already spent billions to comply with them. But environmental groups worry the move is a step toward repealing the limits and could make it harder to impose other regulations in the future. In a statement, the EPA said it is "providing regulatory certainty by transparently and accurately taking account of both costs and benefits." The National Mining Association welcomed the move, calling the mercury limits "punitive" and "massively unbalanced." When coal is burned it releases mercury into the air, where it can cause health risks to people including neurological disorders, heart and lung problems and compromised immune

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